What is Stye medicine?

Children’s allergy medication is often used to treat severe chest pain and other chest conditions.

The medicine has also been used to help people with asthma, and in recent years to treat a range of other conditions including heartburn and asthma.

However, a study published in the Journal of the American College of Chest Physicians suggests it may not be a very good idea to use it on children.

In fact, there is currently no evidence that it is effective for children aged two to four.

The authors, from the University of Maryland, found that children’s chest pain was much less common in adults who used Stye than in children, even though they were more likely to have chest pain themselves.

“There was no significant difference between children and adults in the prevalence of the most common signs of chest pain,” the authors wrote.

“The lack of a significant difference was even more striking in adults.

The mean age of adults with chest pain at the time of their first visit with a Stye specialist was 21.5 years.”

The study found that when adults had used StYE for more than a year, there was a significant decrease in the risk of developing chest pain.

However the authors said there was no clear evidence that Stye treatment was more effective than chest pain medication.

“The risk of chest disease among adults using Stye is very low, and there are no clear benefits of this approach over the treatment of chest infection,” they wrote.

“A randomized, controlled trial is needed to better understand whether Stye might be better than chest infection treatment for treating chest pain in adults.”

They also warned that there was still much work to be done before the new evidence could be used in the treatment for children.

The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has already called for Stye to be withdrawn from children.

The Royal College said it was “unlikely that any benefit of the treatment is to be expected in children”.

“We have no reason to believe that the benefit of Stye for children would be greater than the benefit for adults,” it said in a statement.

Topics:health,children,health-policy,community-and-society,medical-ethics,medicalethics-and/or-ethnology,united-kingdom